Wednesday, 26 June 2019

The Benefit of a Headache


▪A headache is a means of forgiveness and reward.

Abu Said al-Khudri radiallahu anhu reported that the Prophet sallahu alayhi wa salam said:

صُداعُ المؤمنِ ، أو شوكةٌ يُشاكُها ، أو شيءٌ يُؤذيه ؛ يرفعُه اللهُ بها يومً القيامةٍ درجةً ، ويُكفِّرُ عنه بها ذنوبَه

“The headache that afflicts the believer, or a thorn that pricks him/her, or anything that harms him/her, Allah will raise him/her a degree on the day of resurrection and expiate his/her sins due to it”

[Saheeh Targheeb no. 3434]

Also, not having headaches is a bad sign because the people destined to go the Hell-fire do not have headaches:

Abu Hurairah radiallahu anhu said: The Prophet sallahu alayhi wa salam said:

: فَهل وجَدْتَ هذا الصُّدَاعَ ؟ . قال : وما الصُّدَاعُ ؟ قال : عِرْقٌ يَضْرِبُ على الإنسانِ في رأسِهِ . قال : وما وجَدْتَ هذا قطُّ ! فلمَّا ولَّى قال النبيُّ صلَّى اللهُ عليهِ وسلَّمَ : مَنْ أحبَّ أنْ ينظرَ إلى رجلٍ من أهلِ النارِ ؛ فَلْيَنْظُرْ إلى هذا

“…Have you ever felt a headache? The man said: What is a headache? He sallau alayhi wa salam said: A vein that beats in the head of a person. The man said: No I have not experienced that ever! The Prophet sallahu alahyhi wa salam said: Whoever would like to see a man from the people of the Hell-fire, then look at this man!”

[Reported in Ibn Hibban and graded Hasan Saheeh by al-Albani in Saheeh Mawaarid no. 580]
Having headaches are a sign of the People of Imaan and the People of Jannah.

Hafidh Ibn Rajab rahimahullah said:

وصداع الرأس من علامات أهل الإيمان وأهل الجنة

“…And headaches are from the signs of the People of Imaan and the People of Jannah..”

[Lataaif al-Maa’rif pg. 153]

Then he brings the above Hadith and others.

عَنْ أَبِي الزَّيَّاتِ الْقُشَيْرِيِّ , قَالَ: دَخَلْنَا عَلَى أَبِي الدَّرْدَاءِ نَعُودُهُ , فَدَخَلَ عَلَيْنَا أَعْرَابِيٌّ فَقَالَ: مَا لِأَمِيرِكُمْ؟ وَأَبُو الدَّرْدَاءِ يَوْمَئِذٍ أَمِيرٌ , قُلْنَا هُوَ شَاكٍ قَالَ: وَاللهِ مَا اشْتَكَيْتُ قَطُّ , أَوْ قَالَ: مَا صَدَعْتُ قَطُّ فَقَالَ أَبُو الدَّرْدَاءِ:” أَخْرِجُوهُ عَنِّي لِيَمُتْ بِخَطَايَاهُ , مَا أُحِبُّ أَنَّ لِي بِكُلِّ وَصَبٍ وَصَبْتُهُ حُمْرَ النَّعَمِ , وَإِنَّ وَصَبَ الْمُؤْمِنِ يُكَفِّرُ خَطَايَاهُ

On the authority of Abu Zayyaat al-Qushairi rahimahullah said: “We entered upon Abu Darda radiallahu anhu to visit him, when a Bedouin entered upon him. So he said: Where is your Ameer? And Abu Darda was the ameer then. So we said: He is complaining of some pain. The man said: I have not complained of anything or he said: I did not experience a headache ever! Abu Darda radiallahu anhu said: Remove him from me, so he dies from his sins. I do not love that for every pain/sickness that I feel that I am given red camels. For verily, the pain/illness of a believer is an expiation for his sins”

[Reported by Bayhaqi in Shuab al-Imaan no. 9436 and the Muhaqiq of the Book Mukhtaar Ahmad Nadwi graded it Jayyid]

Subhanallah nowadays we complain of headaches and run towards the advil and tyenol!! (I’m not sayings its haram)

May Allah guide us back to the way of the Prophet sallahu alayhi wa salam

Translated by

Faisal Ibn Abdul Qaadir Ibn Hassan
Abu Sulaymaan

The Four Poisons of the Heart



1) Unnecessary Talking

"Excessive talking without dhikr illah harden the heart & the furthest from Allah are those hard-hearted" 
(Tirmidhi)

2) Unrestricted glances

Between the eye & the heart is an immediate connection. If the glances are corrupted, the heart follows.

Allah commands the believing men that they should lower their gaze

قُل لِّلْمُؤْمِنِينَ يَغُضُّوا مِنْ أَبْصَارِهِمْ 24:30
..
إن الله خبيربما يصنعون

3) Too Much Eating

Consuming small/moderate amounts of food assures tenderness of the heart,
strength of the intellect, humility of the self, weakening of desires. Immoderation brings the opposite qualities

"The human does not fill any vessel that is worse than his stomach".
(Tirmidhi)

4) Keeping Bad Company

"A man follows the religion of his friend; so each one should consider whom he makes his friend"
(Abu Dawud)

Tuesday, 25 June 2019

HOW I CAME TO LOVE THE VEIL


By Yvonne Ridley

LONDON

I used to look at veiled women as quiet, oppressed creatures — until I was captured by the Taliban In September 2001, just 15 days after the terrorist attacks on the United States, I snuck into Afghanistan, clad in a head-to-toe blue burqa, intending to write a newspaper account of life under the repressive regime. Instead, I was discovered, arrested and detained for 10 days. I spat and swore at my captors; they called me a “bad” woman but let me go after I promised to read the Koran and study Islam. (Frankly, I‘m not sure who was happier when I was freed — they or I.)

Back home in London, I kept my word about studying Islam — and was amazed by what I discovered. I‘d been expecting Koran chapters on how to beat your wife and oppress your daughters; instead, I found passages promoting the liberation of women. Two-and-a-half years after my capture, I converted to Islam, provoking a mixture of astonishment, disappointment and encouragement among friends and relatives.

Now, it is with disgust and dismay that I watch here in Britain as former foreign secretary Jack Straw describes the Muslim nikab — a face veil that reveals only the eyes — as an unwelcome barrier to integration, with Prime Minister Tony Blair, writer Salman Rushdie and even Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi leaping to his defense.

Having been on both sides of the veil, I can tell you that most Western male politicians and journalists who lament the oppression of women in the Islamic world have no idea what they are talking about. They go on about veils, child brides, female circumcision, honor killings and forced marriages, and they wrongly blame Islam for all this — their arrogance surpassed only by their ignorance.

These cultural issues and customs have nothing to do with Islam. A careful reading of the Koran shows that just about everything that Western feminists fought for in the 1970s was available to Muslim women 1,400 years ago. Women in Islam are considered equal to men in spirituality, education and worth, and a woman’s gift for childbirth and child-rearing is regarded as a positive attribute.

When Islam offers women so much, why are Western men so obsessed with Muslim women’s attire? Even British government ministers Gordon Brown and John Reid have made disparaging remarks about the nikab — and they hail from across the Scottish border, where men wear skirts.

When I converted to Islam and began wearing a headscarf, the repercussions were enormous. All I did was cover my head and hair — but I instantly became a second-class citizen. I knew I‘d hear from the odd Islamophobe, but I didn’t expect so much open hostility from strangers. Cabs passed me by at night, their “for hire” lights glowing. One cabbie, after dropping off a white passenger right in front of me, glared at me when I rapped on his window, then drove off. Another said, “Don’t leave a bomb in the back seat” and asked, “Where’s bin Laden hiding?”

Yes, it is a religious obligation for Muslim women to dress modestly, but the majority of Muslim women I know like wearing the hijab, which leaves the face uncovered, though a few prefer the nikab. It is a personal statement: My dress tells you that I am a Muslim and that I expect to be treated respectfully, much as a Wall Street banker would say that a business suit defines him as an executive to be taken seriously. And, especially among converts to the faith like me, the attention of men who confront women with inappropriate, leering behavior is not tolerable.

I was a Western feminist for many years, but I‘ve discovered that Muslim feminists are more radical than their secular counterparts. We hate those ghastly beauty pageants, and tried to stop laughing in 2003 when judges of the Miss Earth competition hailed the emergence of a bikini-clad Miss Afghanistan, Vida Samadzai, as a giant leap for women’s liberation. They even gave Samadzai a special award for “representing the victory of women’s rights.”

Some young Muslim feminists consider the hijab and the nikab political symbols, too, a way of rejecting Western excesses such as binge drinking, casual sex and drug use. What is more liberating: being judged on the length of your skirt and the size of your surgically enhanced breasts, or being judged on your character and intelligence? In Islam, superiority is achieved through piety — not beauty, wealth, power, position or sex.

I didn’t know whether to scream or laugh when Italy’s Prodi joined the debate last week by declaring that it is “common sense” not to wear the nikab because it makes social relations “more difficult.” Nonsense. If this is the case, then why are cellphones, landlines, e-mail, text messaging and fax machines in daily use? And no one switches off the radio because they can’t see the presenter’s face.

Under Islam, I am respected. It tells me that I have a right to an education and that it is my duty to seek out knowledge, regardless of whether I am single or married. Nowhere in the framework of Islam are we told that women must wash, clean or cook for men. As for how Muslim men are allowed to beat their wives — it’s simply not true. Critics of Islam will quote random Koranic verses or hadith, but usually out of context. If a man does raise a finger against his wife, he is not allowed to leave a mark on her body, which is the Koran’s way of saying, “Don’t beat your wife, stupid.”

It is not just Muslim men who must reevaluate the place and treatment of women. According to a recent National Domestic Violence Hotline survey, 4 million American women experience a serious assault by a partner during an average 12-month period. More than three women are killed by their husbands and boyfriends every day — that is nearly 5,500 since 9/11.

Violent men don’t come from any particular religious or cultural category; one in three women around the world has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime, according to the hotline survey. This is a global problem that transcends religion, wealth, class, race and culture.

But it is also true that in the West, men still believe that they are superior to women, despite protests to the contrary. They still receive better pay for equal work — whether in the mailroom or the boardroom — and women are still treated as sexualized commodities whose power and influence flow directly from their appearance.

And for those who are still trying to claim that Islam oppresses women, recall this 1992 statement from the Rev. Pat Robertson, offering his views on empowered women: Feminism is a “socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians.”

Now you tell me who is civilized and who is not.

****

Please share with others so more can benefit

*Islaaminfo*

*"And keep reminding, because reminding benefits the believers."*(51:55)

Daddys little girl



I was born into a family where my parents were in their 40's. It was like their life has re-begun, despite already having two much older kids.
My dad gave me precious memories.. Long walks, appreciating nature, board-games, the strength to persevere, building blocks of a strong character and personality, my first car..
He was my critic, my go to for advice even when I did the opposite, my strength when I was weak. He picked me up when I fell, shouted at me when I was wrong, thought me that half a loaf is better than no loaf or even a full loaf sometimes..
You left and the tide of time changed, I'm still holding on to all you thought me and persevering.
You are not here, yet you still live within me.. Your memories, your thoughts, your spoils, your actions, your dreams all reside in me..
Sometimes you are so alive in my dreams that when I awake from them it's strange to believe that you no longer physically in my life..

#ShireenM #DurbanMuslima #AspiringToInspire 

Sunday, 23 June 2019

You are hired..

A young man went to seek an important position at a large printing company. He passed the initial interview and was going to meet the director for the final interview. The director saw his resume, it was excellent. And asked,'


"Have you received a scholarship for school?" The boy replied, "No".

'It was your father who paid for your studies? '' Yes.' He replied.

'Where does your father work? ' 'My father is a Blacksmith'


The Director asked the young man to show him his hands.

The young man showed a pair of hands soft and perfect.

'Have you ever helped your parents at their job? '

'Never, my parents always wanted me to study and read more books. Besides, he can do the job better than me.


The director said:

'I have got a request: When you go home today, go and wash the hands of your father and then come see me tomorrow morning.'


The young man felt his chance to get the job was high.


When he returned to his house he asked his father if he would allow him to wash his hands.


His father felt strange, happy, but with mixed feelings and showed his hands to his son. The young man washed his hands, little by little. It was the first time that he noticed his father's hands were wrinkled and they had so many scars. Some bruises were so painful that his skin shuddered when he touched them.


This was the first time that the young man recognized what it meant for this pair of hands to work every day to be able to pay for his studies. The bruises on the hands were the price that his father payed for his education, his school activities and his future.


After cleaning his father's hands the young man stood in silence and began to tidy and clean up the workshop. That night, father and son talked for a long time.


The next morning, the young man went to the office of the director.

The Director noticed the tears in the eyes of the young man when He asked him,


'Can you tell me what you did and what you learned yesterday at your house?'

The boy replied: 'I washed my father's hands and when I finished I stayed and cleaned his workshop.'


'Now I know what it is to appreciate and recognize that without my parents, I would not be who I am today. By helping my father I now realize how difficult and hard it is to do something on my own. I have come to appreciate the importance and the value in helping my family.


The director said, "This is what I look for in my people. I want to hire someone who can appreciate the help of others, a person who knows the hardship others go through to accomplish things, and a person who realizes that  money is not his only goal in life". 


'You are hired'.


A child that has been coddled, protected and given everything he or she wants, develops a mentality of "I have the right" and will always put himself or herself  first, ignoring the efforts of parents, family and friends. If we are this type of protective parent are we really showing love or are we helping to destroy our children?


You can give your child their own room in a big house, good food, a computer, tablet, cell phone, and a big screen TV, but when you're washing the floor or painting a wall, children need to experience that too.


After eating, have them wash the dishes with their brothers and sisters, let them fold laundry or cook with you, pull weeds or mow the lawn. You are not doing this because you are poor and can't afford help. You are doing this because you love them and want them to understand certain things about life. 


Children need to learn to appreciate the amount of effort it takes to do a job right. They need to experience the difficulties in life that people must overcome to be successful and they must learn about failure to be able to succeed.


Children must also learn how to work and play with others and that they will not always win, but they can always work harder to reach their goals. If they've done their best, then they can take pride in all the effort they put forth.


Life is about giving and serving and these qualities are taught in our homes.

Major and minor symptoms of fibromyalgia

Click. The link

Tuesday, 18 June 2019

Tlc.. For fibrofighters



As a fibrofighter, your support structure is most important. With you, yourself not understanding whats happening to you and your body, to you waking up but not really being able to face a day. People around you too may not understand and may not provide you with the support you need. Tlc from loved ones is most important to a fibrofighter. Support and understanding is vital from those around you. It will give the fibrofighter the emotional strength to face the physical issues and not let them sink deeper and deeper into despair and darkness that gives power to the illness. 
#ShireenM #DurbanMuslima #AspiringToInspire #fibromyalgiafighter


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